• Author:
  • Published: Jun 26th, 2014
  • Category: NFL Football
  • Comments: Comments Off on The NFL Pledges Unlimited $ but that is half of the story.

The NFL Pledges Unlimited $ but that is half of the story.

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nfl

Tonight on NNR Evan Weiner of NewJerseyNewsroom.com will join us to discuss the latest in the concussion law suits and other NFL issues. Join us at 6 PM EDT on www.justin.tv/papaburl or fryingpansports.com/radio-show/.

I congratulate the NFL for stepping up to tell the world and the retired players that they will spend whatever it takes to provide the healthcare the players need. But the promise to pay is half of the issue. The other half is how the agreement will be implemented.

Unfortunately, the history of the NFL caring for their retired players is bleak at best. As I have argued before, the retired players have no representation in negotiations between the NFL and NFLPA. Former NFLPA head Gene Upshaw admitted that he was only representing the current players.

As a result, even when retired players got some crumbs off the table, the NFL and NFLPA made it nearly impossible for the players in need to actually qualify for the help they needed. The league and players association have installed middle men that were paid based on how little money they dispensed.

If the same type of “pay for no pay” system is part of this settlement, things for those in need will be no better. The NFL should set up a committee of medical doctors and retirees to determine which players deserve and need help. The retirees should include players from the pre-93 group. Those players both receive less in retirement pay and are older and more in need of medical help.

The bottom line is the Courts need to approve not only the final settlement but also the system that will make decisions about who gets the help and how much medical support is to be awarded. If the issue is left to the NFL and NFLPA, things will not be better for the players that need the support.

The NFL is a billion dollar a year business that was built on the backs of the retired players. Not only do the retirees deserve medical help, they have earned the right to get it. If those players had not given their bodies to the game, pro football would not be the financial goldmine it is today.

I will continue to report on what the NFL does and how it administers the program. Fryingpansports will not let the issue die.

That is what I think. Tell us what you think.

NOTE: Check out the live News, Notes and Rumors show on Monday, Thursday and Friday at 6 PM Eastern on or https://fryingpansports.com/radio-show/. On Samantha Bunten of NBC Sports, former NFL scout Kelron Sykes and I talk NFL draft with just a little Indians and Cavs thrown in. The archive is available on https://fryingpansports.com/radio-show/. Please join us.

Bill Smith is a former coach of several semi-pro teams, has officiated both football and basketball, done color on radio for college football and basketball and has scouted talent. He edits https://fryingpansports.com. He has also published several novels on and a non-fiction work at http://www.merriam-press.com/. Follow him on twitter @NNRonDSN to get the schedule of Special News, Notes and Rumors broadcasts. You can hear the previous shows on https://fryingpansports.com/radio-show/ and the live show Mondays at 6 PM Eastern time on .

He also edits .

To keep up with the News, Notes & Rumors podcasts, follow me on twitter @NNRonDSN.

  • Author:
  • Published: Jun 2nd, 2014
  • Category: NFL Football
  • Comments: Comments Off on The NFL & NFLPA need to be investigated for abandoning ex-players.

The NFL & NFLPA need to be investigated for abandoning ex-players.

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nfl

NOTE: Tonight News, Notes & Rumors will preview the AFC North. Join Samantha Bunten of NBC Sports, former NFL scout Kelron Sykes and me at 6 PM EDT on or https://fryingpansports.com/radio-show/. Thanks.

Open letter to Sen. Sherrod Brown and Sen. Rob Portman

The NFL and NFLPA have conspired to prevent retired players from getting the health care they have earned and deserve.

The NFL has falsely assumed that the NFLPA represents both current and retired players. That is not the case at all. The NFLPA has made it very clear by words and actions that they could care less about those no longer in the game. Given the opportunity to grant more money to retired players or the current players, they have chosen to screw the retirees and get more for the active guys.

By allowing the NFLPA to represent the retired players, the NFL has turned it back on those that need help the most. The NFL finally agreed to give the thousands of former players suffering from concussion syndrome a total of 765 million dollars for health care. That is not nearly enough given the skyrocketing cost of health care. The judge in the case has indicated that amount is likely not nearly enough to solve the health issues of the players involved.

Those that are particularly at risk are the players that retired before 1993. While the restructured program did a little more for those that retired after the implementation date of the CBA, those that retired before it went into effect are no better off. It has to be remembered that prior to 1993 players were paid much less than those that have played since.

I had a Hall of Fame player on my radio show last year that receives a “pension” from the NFL of less than $500 per month after more than 10 years of playing. The retirement was based on a percentage of the salary of the players which were considered to be “part time” jobs. Those that played in the 1960’s averaged $30,000 per year. By 1992 the average had grown to around $400 K but a few highly paid players skewed the average. In 2013 the average had grown to 1.9 million dollars.

Former Raider Dave Pear was on my show last week. He said the goal of the NFL and NFLPA in handling claims is to “deny until they die.”

Like most other players that retired before the 1993 CBA, he had to depend on the taxpayer via the workers compensation fund to get any help whatsoever. It is hard to believe that a Billion dollar a year business can force the taxpayers to fund those injured in the course of their uniquely dangerous employment.

The question now is what can the Federal Government do to solve these issues? First, the Attorney General needs to investigate the validity of the NFLPA to negotiate on behalf of the retired players. They also need to examine the amount of money set aside for retired players. Because the retired players had no representation in the negotiations, the existing agreements need to be struck down and restructured by a mediator.

The Labor department should also investigate how the NFL and NFLPA is allowed to under-fund health benefits and push the health costs to the taxpayer. While workers comp funds handle “normal” workers, dangerous professions like the police and fire departments are covered by special departments in most states. The same should be done for NFL players. Special risks demand special units that understand the issue that those people face.

Senators, we need your help in this. There are two teams in Ohio and thousands of retired players that are voters and that deserve your protection. Please help them with their issues not only for their sake but for the sake of taxpayers in the state. You both have the power to get this started and I have faith that if you do, you will be successful.

Thank you in advance for your help.

If you agree with me that this cause needs to be supported, please donate to help Dave Pear continue to get the truth out on . Thanks.

That is what I think. Tell us what you think.

NOTE: Check out the live News, Notes and Rumors show on Monday, Thursday and Friday at 6 PM Eastern on or https://fryingpansports.com/radio-show/. On Samantha Bunten of NBC Sports, former NFL scout Kelron Sykes and I talk NFL draft with just a little Indians and Cavs thrown in. The archive is available on https://fryingpansports.com/radio-show/. Please join us.

Bill Smith is a former coach of several semi-pro teams, has officiated both football and basketball, done color on radio for college football and basketball and has scouted talent. He edits https://fryingpansports.com. He has also published several novels on and a non-fiction work at http://www.merriam-press.com/. Follow him on twitter @NNRonDSN to get the schedule of Special News, Notes and Rumors broadcasts. You can hear the previous shows on https://fryingpansports.com/radio-show/ and the live show Mondays at 6 PM Eastern time on .

He also edits .

To keep up with the News, Notes & Rumors podcasts, follow me on twitter @NNRonDSN.

NFL Concussion Lawsuits

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NFL Concussion Lawsuits

ESPN commentator and former National Football ...

ESPN commentator and former National Football League (NFL) player Mike Golic prepares to run a play with crew members aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Russell (DDG 59). ESPN commentator Mark Schlereth, also a former NFL player, and Green Bay Packer fullback William Henderson joined Golic for a visit aboard Russell to watch the 2005 Super Bowl with the ship’s crew, have lunch and tour the ship. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The National Football League (NFL) is under scrutiny as thousands of players are coming forward in a class action lawsuit claiming the league failed to inform players of the long-term health problems associated with concussions. The players also claim that they were encouraged to play thorough head injuries without appropriate care or recovery time.

According to reports from the Associated Press, 3,377 players have taken legal action and sued the NFL claiming that not only were they not informed of the dangers of head injuries, but that not enough has been done to take care of them after retiring. Of these players, 26 are Hall of Famers. There are 5,249 total plaintiffs in the case including spouses and other player representatives.

Separate lawsuits were consolidated into one master complaint and filed by the players’ lawyers in June of 2012, specifically claiming the NFL did not inform players about medical findings that link football-related head injuries to permanent brain injuries such as dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, and an increased risk of suicidal behavior.

In response, the NFL asked a federal judge in August of 2012 to dismiss the more than 100 lawsuits, claiming that the case should instead be resolved according to the league’s collective bargaining agreement. The NFL also argues that the lawsuits do not have sufficient proof that the league concealed the risks associated with head injuries.

Important Dates

There were a number of events that lead to the NFL concussion lawsuit in 2012. Some important dates include the following:

  • 1994 – The NFL creates the Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries committee
  • 2002 – NFL player Mike Webster dies at age 50. Webster suffered multiple concussions as a player and showed signs of dementia plus psychiatric illness late in his life. Bennet I. Omalu, M.D., discovers structural deformity in Webster’s brain – the first evidence of the danger of multiple concussions.
  • 2004 – NFL player Justin Strzelczyk dies in an automobile accident caused by brain damage. His death began the discussion about football head injuries.
  • June 2005 – Terry Long commits suicide. Doctors believe brain damage from multiple concussions contributed to his depression and suicide.
  • July 2005 – Omalu publishes an article about his findings. The NFL MTBI committee’s doctors denounce the findings and demand he retract the article.
  • 2006 – NFL player Andre Waters commits suicide. Omalu examines the brain tissue and determines Waters’ depression was caused by brain damage due to multiple concussions. The NFL declines to comment on the findings.
  • March 2007 – The NFL puts into place the “88 Plan” to provide financial support to former players suffering from dementia. Dr. Elliot Pellman, head of the NFL’s MTBI, also resigns.
  • 2008 – Four more former NFL players die. Tom McHale from an accidental drug overdose, Gerald Small, Curtis Whitley from a drug overdose, and John Grimsley from an accidental gunshot wound.
  • 2009 – Then still-active NFL player Chris Henry dies in an auto accident at age 26. It was later found that Henry suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy due to multiple concussions, the first still-active NFL player to have it. Former player Lou Creekmur dies from complications of dementia.
  • October 2009 – The US. House Judiciary Committee convenes hearings on legal issues and football head injuries
  • December 2009 – Return-to-play rules for players that sustain concussions and head injuries are changed
  • 2011 – Former NFL player Dave Duerson commits suicide

From football to boxing and any other athletic event, brain injuries are very serious and could be detrimental to one’s life. Further studies will inevitably be conducted on this topic, revealing more about the long-term effects of concussions and head injuries.

Author Bio

Carlos is a blogger who has written for brain injury lawyer websites. He is interested in the effects of brain injuries as well as ways to prevent them.

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