Does the NFL need to change the overtime rules?

nfl

There were a couple of proposals but the final one that will be voted on this week at the owner’s meeting in Orlando is as follows:

If the team that wins the coin toss goes down the field and scores a touchdown, the game is over. However, if that team is stopped and kicks a field goal, they would have to kick off and give the other team a chance to either score a touchdown or kick a field goal. A 3-3 tie in overtime would begin a true sudden death scenario.

The biggest argument is that both teams should get a shot at the ball. There have been more wins recently by the team getting the ball on the flip. From 75-93 the team that got the ball first won 46.8 of the time. However, from 94-09 the team that got the ball won 60% of overtime games. Worse, the percentage of games ended by a field goal jumped from 18% in 75-93 to 26% in the 94-09 period.

Another argument against the change says that there should not be 2 sets of rules one for the regular season and one for the playoffs. But we have 2 sets … Read more at FryingPanSports

Big name cuts in the NFL have little to do with the salary cap.

Fryingpan Sports

Big name cuts in the NFL have little to do with the salary cap.

By Bill Smith

Marvin Harrison (WR) cut. 12 million

Derrick Brooks (LB) cut. 3.75 million

Ike Hilliard (WR) cut. 2.07 million

Warrick Dunn (RB) cut. 3 million

Joey Galloway (WR) cut. 3.5 million

Cato June (LB) cut. 3.7 million

Donnie Edwards (LB) cut. 4.8 million

Damon Huard (QB) cut. 2.6 million

Laveranues Coles (WR) cut. 6 million.

And that is not all. There will be more. What do all of these players have in common beside a large cap number in 08? They are all older. The NFL Players Association has been talking about the uncapped 2010 helping the middle and higher paid players but that is not going to happen.

What will happen is that teams will be cutting as many expensive players as possible before the lockout in 2010 happens but it is not due to the salary cap. The cap was expected to be around 120.5 million in 09 when it was first calculated in June of 08. Then the estimate grew to 123 million and last week went to 127 million. That is really a lot of money to spread … Read more at FryingPanSports

Some results from the Combine can be deceiving.

Fryingpan Sports

Some results from the Combine can be deceiving.

By Bill Smith

Weight lifting numbers

One of the most entertaining aspects of the Combine is the coverage of the weight lifting. All players lift 225 for as many reps as they can. You would think that you want to draft the strongest (most reps at 225) O line or D line and linebackers. Not so much.

The arm length of the player is inversely related to the number of reps. Those with shorter arms tend to complete more reps than those with long to very long arms. But history tells us that short armed O and D linemen fail at alarming rate.

My Advice: If your O or D lineman gets past 25, that is good enough if he has long enough arms.

The 40 yard dash.

One factor that I did not discuss yesterday about the 40 is the “straight line” guy. Some guys have really good straight line speed but can not change direction without losing speed. Football is not played in straight lines.

My Advice: If a player has really bad shuttle and 3 cone (which is really 5 cone) tests, then buyer beware. Track guys Read more at FryingPanSports

What to look for at the Combine—Defense

Fryingpan Sports

What to look for at the Combine—Defense

By Bill Smith

The NFL Combine is now covered by the NFL network more than ever before. Some of the most important parts of the combine are not televised. The combine was originally a league wide group physical examination to save money. It has developed into what you see today.

The NFL scout is almost as interested in eliminating players from his “want” board as in ranking the prospects. In interviews, written tests, and physicals a team may see something about a guy they don’t like and drop him from further consideration.

There are certain things that NFL scouts look for at the combine. Today we will look at the major items on defense. Yesterday, we looked at the offense.

D Line

Prior to the workouts, check out the arm length of the D line and the O line for that matter as well. Short arms are a major problem for the O and D line. An O lineman can grab you but if your arms are too short, you can’t push the opponent away. There have been a large number of high DL picks that have failed in the NFL … Read more at FryingPanSports

What to look for at the Combine—Offense

Fryingpan Sports

What to look for at the Combine—Offense

By Bill Smith

The NFL Combine is now covered by the NFL network more than ever before. There are certain things that NFL scouts look for at the combine. Today we will look at the major items on offense. Tomorrow, we will look at the defense.

Quarterback

Unfortunately most top QB prospects don’t throw at the combine. They wait for pro days at their schools. That is a mistake. Joe Flacco from Delaware really helped himself at the 08 combine. He went from a high 3rd round choice to the top half of the first round to Baltimore to a rookie of the year candidate.

3-5-7 step drop passing drill Too many of the QB prospects come from the spread offense. They worked in college from the shotgun and didn’t have to worry about footwork.

Check out how quickly the QB sets up after the drop and finds his target.

Second, watch the quickness of the release. As the QB takes the last step of the drop the ball should be coming out of his hand.

Check out the arm strength and accuracy. The key test is the 15 yard … Read more at FryingPanSports

The NFL and NFLPA must keep negotiations out of the press.

Fryingpan Sports

The NFL and NFLPA must keep negotiations out of the press.

t

Roger Goodell

By Bill Smith

Technorati Tags: NFL, NFLPA, labor agreement, strike, negotiations, press, owners

The NFLPA issued a statement that it has built a 118 million dollar strike fund.

On Jan. 29th at the NFLPA annual press conference, it released to the media a report that NFL teams were making an average of 24.7 million a year and owners had no reason to opt out of the current agreement.

Then NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell went before the media at the Super Bowl and said the following:

“That report is not accurate. We are very clear. We understand our numbers. The ownership spent a tremendous amount of time evaluating the Collective Bargaining Agreement. I think they came to the conclusion that it was better to terminate that agreement and go into a negotiation where we could work to try to come up with something that would work for all clubs and our players rather than continue on with that system.”

I have no idea if that report commissioned by the players association is accurate or not. I do know one thing. IT DOESN’T MATTER! The fact … Read more at FryingPanSports