Umpires Leave With More Cash in Their Tennis Bag Than the Tennis Players

Money for NothingSome major athletes have made millions by showcasing their talent in public arenas, leaving matches stuffing loads of cash into their tennis bags. Roger Federer, for instance, is the top paid tennis competitor with about 41.8 million in prize winnings.  Maria Sharapova, Rafael Nadal, Andy Roddick and the Williams sisters have also made a pretty penny  by playing in some of the world’s most prestigious tennis tournaments.  Although the lucky few earn a living that would be hard to spend in a lifetime, the payoff for some athletes is surprisingly small. At Futures tennis events, for example, the players may leave with less than the chair umpires.

The USTA Pro Circuit can easily be compared to the minor leagues of tennis. The circuit is composed of 88 events; “Futures” events with the prize money totaling around $10,000 to $15,000 and “Challenger” events with the total prize money running in the $50,000 to $100,000 range.

Recently, in Vero Beach, Fla. there was a $10,000 futures event where Australian player, John-Patrick Smith won the title over Brazilian, Pedro Zerbini. The crowd consisted of more than 300 tennis fans that each paid either $10 or $20 for their seat.

Smith`s prize money … Read more at FryingPanSports

The View from the Umpire Chair: Not Always the Best Seat in the House

Typically, when we watch tennis matches we focus on the players; watching it on our television or, if we are lucky enough, from a seat in the stands. But do you ever wonder what a tennis match would look like sitting in the umpire chair?

Sitting in the umpire chair during a match not only gives you the best view but you are the final say on all calls; a rather powerful position.

Although sitting in the umpire chair gives a sense of authority, the view from the top isn’t always as great as you would think.

In September of 2011, many top tennis officials decided not to participate in the US Open and opted to give up their prime seat on the umpire chair.

The 2011 US Open raked in a record high $23.7 million in prize money with the tournaments total earnings exceeding $200 million. Despite the tournament`s high revenue,  the gold badge chair umpires, some who officiate at the legendary Wimbledon tournament, only make $250 per day sitting in the umpire chairs at the US Open; the lowest pay for any Grand Slam tournament.

A retired gold badge chair umpire, Norm Chryst, stated that, “The U.S. Open … Read more at FryingPanSports

What makes the Masters so Unique?

I was in my local watering hole the other day for a pleasant Friday afternoon pub dinner, only to find a golf tournament being shown on the big screen slightly surreal but none the less enjoyable. It seems that every time the PGA or European tour come through, not too much attention is paid to these relatively high stakes competition but when the Masters comes along even the most passive of a Golf enthusiast are truly engrossed in the four day tournament this year held in Augusta.

As I found myself enthralled by the amazing shots and the drama of the game at hand it caught me unaware that an hour had passed and I hadn’t taken my eyes off the screen, watching each and every lusciously carved shot by Schwartzel.

Obviously it is a Major Tournament and the golfer is judged on how many Majors they win over the course of their career, but there always seems to be an extra feeling of urgency when it comes to each player’s shot. On paper it is just another major and the money would pale in significance to what I feel is the major factor that inspires the pressure and … Read more at FryingPanSports

Watch the London Olympics on Television

If you enjoy watching sporting events then you will want to be sure to tune into watch the London 2012 Olympic Games. They will be broadcast to an audience around the world. The London Olympics will be watched by millions of viewers around the globe. There will be broadcasters from every corner of the world in London with their cameras trained on the athletes. Viewers will be able to watch an amazing array of athletic abilities on display.

These games will take place in the summer. They will feature a wide variety of sporting events. While the winter Olympics feature sports like hockey and skiing the summer games feature sports like swimming, diving, and track and field competitions. The athletes that take part are the best in the world. They have competed against other athletes in their own countries in order to win the right to represent their country in London. Only the best get to go. They are able to compete for medals to show off their amazing abilities. The top athlete wins a gold medal. The second best athlete wins a silver medal. The third best athlete wins a bronze medal. Quite often the top athletes become famous … Read more at FryingPanSports

The Top Five most Ludicrously Overpaid Sportspeople

There’s crazy money in sport ––– we all know it. And it’s never been fresher on the mind: January’s football transfer window saw £136 million spent in transfer fees on just four players, Chelsea’s Fernando Torres, Liverpool’s Andy Carroll, Manchester City’s Edin Dzeko and Aston Villa’s Darren Bent.

But as stunning as those transfer fees are, the real crazy money is in the salaries top sportspeople get paid.
After all, the first big news story of the football season came from the transfer that wasn’t. Having threatened to leave Manchester United, Wayne Rooney’s new contract sees him pocketing £26,000 – the nation’s average annual salary – every day.

Outrageous? Of course. But even those massive earnings pale into insignificance when you compare him to some of sport’s most extravagantly compensated individuals. Rooney might be rich but at least he’s helping to win championships – which is by no means the case for all the stars below. Without further ado, here’s our list of the most ludicrously overpaid sports stars on the global scene.

Fernando Alonso (Motorsport)

Formula 1’s highest earning driver is pocketing an annual £23million retainer from Ferrari – and that’s just his fee for driving. He can (and … Read more at FryingPanSports