• Author:
  • Published: Oct 12th, 2011
  • Category: Other
  • Comments: 1

Famous Tennis Players: Profile of Andy Roddick

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Andy Roddick at the 2009 US Open

Image via Wikipedia

When it comes to American tennis, Andy Roddick has been the lone hope for men’s tennis success on the ATP tour.  American tennis fans have been spoiled over the years with incredible amounts of talent.  After Sampras, Agassi, Connors, and other greats, we’ve become greedy for more quality tennis players.  Roddick has proved a solid player, but he hasn’t been able to live up to these great expectations.  Aside from his single US Open title, Roddick has been unable to capture any other major tournament trophies.  His modus operandi has been consistency over the years, rather than big victories.  Roddick nears the end of a great career where he has been a permanent fixture in the top ten, but his inability to win big titles has been frustrating for both him and the American fans.

The Andy Roddick Tennis Game and Serve

Roddick is among the greatest tennis players famous for their serves.  The Roddick serve was consistently the biggest of his day, often nearing 140 mph.  His serve at 155 mph held the record for fastest until Ivo Karlovic one upped him with a 156 mph one.  Serving has always been a staple of the Roddick game, but it has made him terribly one dimensional.  The American was once regarded as a heavy hitter–though his weapons no longer pack the punch they once did.  The forehand is less effective and powerful, while players in the men’s game have grown used to heavy hitting and Roddick’s power isn’t quite as special as it once was.  His serve is still a weapon, but it is a rarity for him to be able to back up powerful serving with consistent returns.

It was only a few years ago that Roddick’s game was a fierce proposition on the grass at Wimbledon.  He exhibited incredible performances reaching back to back finals, only to be dismissed by an unbeatable Roger Federer.  In an era without such a dominant grass player it’s almost certain that Roddick would have secured at least one Wimbledon title.

No longer is Roddick able to push opponents around the baseline with his ground strokes.  He has transitioned from different coaches over the years (Gilbert and Connors recently) finally settling on Larry Stefanki.  Stefanki’s resume is nothing short of spectacular, having coached players like McEnroe, Rios, and Kafelnikov.  The adjustment for Roddick has been to mix up his game more.  He realizes that he cannot compete in long and drawn out baseline rallies.  Smart and aggressive tennis is the only option left for success.  Well timed tactical ventures to the net are now a common part of the Roddick game.  Stefanki, and others, have brought Roddick’s game to a strategic level that really eclipses his former self.  The problem is that the power of the men’s game has passed Roddick by.  While he can no longer hang in rallies with big hitters, he must find solutions in difficult shot combinations and consistent execution.

Roddick’s Future Goals

At 30 Roddick has a few good years left if he stays in top condition.  From this point in his career it is unlikely he can still vie for grand slam titles against the likes of Djokovic, but that doesn’t mean he can’t continue to compete at a high level.  It’s unfortunate for Roddick that he has recently fallen out of the top eight.  This drop will exclude him from the end of the year ATP World Tour Finals held in London.   The next few years will see Roddick take down a handful of smaller titles on hard court tennis surfaces to add to an already impressive resume.  Unfortunately for Roddick, American tennis fans will continue to be unsatisfied with such results.

  • Author:
  • Published: Sep 27th, 2011
  • Category: Other
  • Comments: 1

The Barclays ATP World Tour Finals 2011

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Juan Martín del Potro at the 2009 US Open

Image via Wikipedia

As the tennis season comes to a close, the last big tournament of the year is the special qualification event in London.  The ATP Barclays is unique because the draw is limited to the top eight players in the ATP tour rankings for the year.  This means that we get to witness an event that exhibits the best players who have been performing well all year long.  The draw isn’t like a normal tournament, instead it begins with round robin play that eliminates half the field.  The semi finals and finals are played in a more standard fashion, but the quality of tennis always promises to be incredible.  Players have direct incentive for each match because the  point and prize distribution for the Barclays tennis tournament depends on each individual victory.

Looking Back at the ATP Finals 2010

The tournament last year ended up in a heated final between Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal.  Federer had something to prove after having a less than stellar year, and prove it he did.  He took down Nadal, who was ranked number one at the time, in three fantastic sets.  The Barclays world tour finals is one event that Nadal has never managed to win.  One problem is that the indoor hard court surface does not suit his defensive game.  Players are able to take advantage by being aggressive and stepping into the Spaniard’s high and looping shots.  Federer on the other hand added another tally to his resume, making the ATP Barclays 2010 his 5th year end championship title.

The ATP Barclays 2011 Preview

This years ATP final will have a lot of familiar faces.  The “big four” as they’ve been nicknamed consist of Djokovic, Nadal, Federer, and Murray.  All of these players were in the event last year, but the dynamic has changed significantly.  Djokovic should be a huge favorite for this ATP final crown considering the incredible season he has had–if he plays.  The aggressive plays and shot making produced by the Novak Djokovic racquet this year has made the season a competition for second place.  The Serbian, however, was sidelined recently by a back injury he suffered in Davis Cup play against the Argentine Juan Martin Del Potro.  It’s questionable whether he will make a full recovery in time to see competition at London in November.  If he does play at full speed it isn’t likely anyone will be able to touch him.  The fast hard courts are so well suited to his game that his main competitor, Nadal, will be at a monstrous disadvantage against him.

Barclays Tennis Comes to London

The final tour event of the year is held in London, home court advantage Murray.  Andy Murray still hasn’t broken through to win a grand slam title yet, but he has persevered as the solid number four player the entire year.  His main problem though is that he can’t crack any of those top three players.  Not a good weakness to have in a tournament where those players make up  37.5% of the field.  To win here would be a big boost for Murray and he could really use it.  The surface isn’t bad for his game, so there isn’t any reason this can’t be his tournament to make a big move.

© 2011 FryingPanSports. All Rights Reserved.

This blog is powered by the Wordpress platform and beach rentals.