• Author:
  • Published: May 14th, 2012
  • Category: Tennis
  • Comments: Comments Off on The History of the Grand Slam

The History of the Grand Slam

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Originally applied to golfing tournaments in the 1930s, the term “Grand Slam” was first used for tennis by John Kieran, a newspaper columnist. Today, The Grand Slam refers to the four major tournaments in the sport of tennis. The tournaments are ranked according to world tour ranking, public attention, prize-money, number of players and player field size. The four major grand slam tennis tournaments include Wimbledon, The French Open, the US Open and the Australian Open.

Image courtesy of Shreyans Bhansali, Flickr

The term grand slam is used to indicate that a player has won all the four major tennis tournaments in a single calendar year. For many years, the term grand slam has also been used to refer to the major tournaments themselves.
A Timeline of Grand Slam Tennis Tournament Wins
1938: John Donald Budge (Don Budge), the American tennis champion, won all of the four men’s singles titles
1962 & 1969: Rodney George Laver (Rod Laver), the Australian tennis champion, has won the grand slam twice in his seven years as the world’s top ranking tennis star
1969 – 1971: Margaret Smith Court, the Australian World No.1, won the grand slam three times; once for the Ladies’ singles and twice in the Mixed Doubles category – 1969 US Open to 1971 Australian Open
1983: Stefan Edberg won the grand slam in the junior discipline being the only tennis player to do so
Wimbledon Tennis Tournament
Wimbledon is held every year in June/ July and is one of the oldest, most highly respected of all tennis events ever held. Wimbledon, as it is commonly referred to, has a rich history of some of the world finest players demonstrating their skills on this prestigious tournament’s grass courts. Wimbledon is preceded by the Australian Open and the French Open tennis tournaments, coming third in the line-up of the grand slam events.
Wimbledon hosts five main events each year including: Gentlemen’s Singles; Ladies’ Singles; Ladies Doubles; Gentlemen’s Doubles; Mixed Doubles, and a number of other tournaments as well. Image courtesy of Kol Tregaskes, Flickr
Winners’ Records:
• Gentlemen’s Singles – William Renshaw and Pete Sampras have both won 7 titles each
• Ladies’ Singles – Martina Navratilova holds the record for 9 wins during her career
• Gentlemen’s Doubles – Todd Woodbridge with 9 titles
• Ladies’ Doubles – Elizabeth Ryan with 12 titles
• Mixed Doubles – Elizabeth Ryan with 12 titles
• Billie Jean King and Martina Navratilova have both won 20 titles each and continue to hold the record for most number of wins at Wimbledon
The French Open 
The prestigious French tennis tournament is named after the famous aviator, Roland Garros. The event spans two weeks from late May to Early June and is played at the Stade Roland Garros in Paris, France. The second of the four grand slam events, French Open is the only grand slam event to be played on clay courts.
Considered one of the toughest tennis tournaments in terms of physical capabilities, the men’s five-set singles matches do not have the tiebreak option in the final set.
Begun in 1891, the first championship matches were one day events and did not have the world’s best players participating. When the tournament became fully international approximately 24 years later, a number of tennis stars began appearing on the courts of Roland Garros.
Rafael Nadal won his sixth title beating Roger Federer to become the current Men’s Singles winner for 2011. Li Na of China won her first grand slam title to take the Women’s singles French Open title. Image courtesy of y.caradec, Flickr The U.S. Open
The United States Open Tennis Tournament is the fourth event in the grand slam series of four. The tournament is held from August to September each year and hosts five championship titles: Men’s and Women’s singles; Men’s and Women’s Doubles; Mixed Doubles. The tournament also hosts additional matches for junior player participation.
Title wins include:
• Men’s Singles
Bill Larned, Richard Sears and Bill Tilden of the USA – 7 wins (before 1968)
Jimmy Connors, Pete Sampras of the USA – 5 wins (after 1968)
• Women’s Singles
Molla Bjurstedt Mallory of the USA – 8 wins (before 1968)
Chris Evert of the USA – 7 wins (after 1968)
Image courtesy of Pabo76, Flickr
The Australian Open
The first of the four grand slam tournaments, the Australian Open is held over the last two weeks of January in Melbourne, Australia. Featuring Men’s and Women’s Singles; Mixed Doubles; Junior matches; Wheelchair matches; Legends and Exhibition events; the tournaments have been held at Melbourne Park since the late 1980s.
The Australian Open is a high attendance grand slam event and the first to introduce indoor play to cope with extreme weather conditions. The two primary courts are the Hisense Arena and Rod Laver Arena. The Australian Open is also the richest tennis tournament worldwide.
The current champions for 2012 include: Novak Djokovic – Men’s singles; Victoria Azarenka – Women’s singles; Leander Paes/ Radek Stepanek – Men’s Doubles; Svetlana Kuznetsova/ Vera Zvonareva – Women’s Doubles. Image courtesy of Two Big Paws, Flickr

This article was produced on behalf of Keith Prowse, the UK’s leading provider of corporate hospitality. With an affinity to sport, Keith Prowse offers official hospitality at some of the finest sporting events – visit their website for Wimbledon hospitality 2012.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 9.0/10 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: +1 (from 1 vote)

Five Sports Stars Who Refused to Let Age get in the Way

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Chicago Bulls. Michael Jordan 1997

Image via Wikipedia

American goalkeeper Kasey Keller will retire this month at the end of the current MLS season at the ripe old age of 41. The Seattle Sounders stopper and former Leicester City and Tottenham player has already been honoured in bizarre fashion with a corn maze tribute at a Seattle farm and is one of a select band of top performers to extend his sporting career into his 40s. We look at five more athletes who refused to let the sands of time stop them in their tracks.

Stanley Matthews

Stanley Matthews was admired as one of the greatest players to grace the game of football, but he also raised the bar when it comes to competing well beyond the usual age limits, having incredibly played his last competitive game at the age of 70. He also played at the highest level of English football until he was 50, becoming the oldest to play in the top tier of the English league in the process and went on to become the oldest player to represent England when he played for the national team against Denmark at the grand old age of 52.

Brad Friedel

Brad Friedel’s family didn’t need to worry about 40th birthday ideas when he hit the milestone age in May. The veteran ‘keeper was gifted a lucrative two-year contract with Premier League side Tottenham Hotspurs, after turning down shorter term offers from former club Aston Villa among others. The USA international continues the theme of evergreen American goalkeepers and will be nudging 42 when his current contract expires. Don’t bet against him continuing beyond that either.

Michael Jordan

Not content with becoming one of the most famous sportsmen of all time, basketball icon Michael Jordan kept everyone guessing by retiring not once, not twice, but three times. His first retirement in 1993 shocked the basketball world when he announced he was quitting the game at the age of 30 after bagging three straight N.B.A. titles with the Chicago Bulls. A rather underwhelming career in the baseball minor leagues followed before he returned to basketball and the Bulls in 1995. His second retirement came in 1999 at the respectable age of 35, but he refused to leave it there and returned to professional play with the Washington Wizards in 2001, going on to become the first 40-year-old to hit 43 points in an N.B.A. game shortly before he retired for (probably) the final time in 2003.

John Whittemore

Leaving all the others trailing, Californian sportsman Whittemore was hailed as the world’s oldest athlete when he threw the javelin and discus at a Masters Track competition in 2004 at the almost unbelievable age of 104, just six weeks before turning 105. He sadly passed away just six months later but not without securing his place in sporting folklore.

Martina Navratilova

The Czech-born, American based tennis star wrote herself into the record books with 167 career titles, including becoming the oldest ever Grand Slam winner by picking up the mixed doubles titles at Wimbledon and the Australian open aged 46. She continued to add milestones becoming the oldest player to win a professional singles match by winning her opening round at Wimbledon a year later and finished in style by beating her own record and winning the mixed doubles title at the US Open in 2006 aged 49. Sadly she was narrowly pipped to winning ITV series I’m a Celebrity…Get Me Out if Here in 2008 by squeaky-voiced Eastender Joe Swash.
This article has been created by Activity Superstore, the UK’s leading Gift Experience Days supplier.

This article has been created by Activity Superstore, the UK’s leading Gift Experience Days supplier.

  • Be Ready For Retirement & Plan Your Pension Now (2009taxes.org)
  • 2 of the Greatest Ever Female Pool Players (brutusreport.blogspot.com)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 10.0/10 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: +1 (from 1 vote)
  • Author:
  • Published: Oct 12th, 2011
  • Category: Other
  • Comments: 1

Famous Tennis Players: Profile of Andy Roddick

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Andy Roddick at the 2009 US Open

Image via Wikipedia

When it comes to American tennis, Andy Roddick has been the lone hope for men’s tennis success on the ATP tour.  American tennis fans have been spoiled over the years with incredible amounts of talent.  After Sampras, Agassi, Connors, and other greats, we’ve become greedy for more quality tennis players.  Roddick has proved a solid player, but he hasn’t been able to live up to these great expectations.  Aside from his single US Open title, Roddick has been unable to capture any other major tournament trophies.  His modus operandi has been consistency over the years, rather than big victories.  Roddick nears the end of a great career where he has been a permanent fixture in the top ten, but his inability to win big titles has been frustrating for both him and the American fans.

The Andy Roddick Tennis Game and Serve

Roddick is among the greatest tennis players famous for their serves.  The Roddick serve was consistently the biggest of his day, often nearing 140 mph.  His serve at 155 mph held the record for fastest until Ivo Karlovic one upped him with a 156 mph one.  Serving has always been a staple of the Roddick game, but it has made him terribly one dimensional.  The American was once regarded as a heavy hitter–though his weapons no longer pack the punch they once did.  The forehand is less effective and powerful, while players in the men’s game have grown used to heavy hitting and Roddick’s power isn’t quite as special as it once was.  His serve is still a weapon, but it is a rarity for him to be able to back up powerful serving with consistent returns.

It was only a few years ago that Roddick’s game was a fierce proposition on the grass at Wimbledon.  He exhibited incredible performances reaching back to back finals, only to be dismissed by an unbeatable Roger Federer.  In an era without such a dominant grass player it’s almost certain that Roddick would have secured at least one Wimbledon title.

No longer is Roddick able to push opponents around the baseline with his ground strokes.  He has transitioned from different coaches over the years (Gilbert and Connors recently) finally settling on Larry Stefanki.  Stefanki’s resume is nothing short of spectacular, having coached players like McEnroe, Rios, and Kafelnikov.  The adjustment for Roddick has been to mix up his game more.  He realizes that he cannot compete in long and drawn out baseline rallies.  Smart and aggressive tennis is the only option left for success.  Well timed tactical ventures to the net are now a common part of the Roddick game.  Stefanki, and others, have brought Roddick’s game to a strategic level that really eclipses his former self.  The problem is that the power of the men’s game has passed Roddick by.  While he can no longer hang in rallies with big hitters, he must find solutions in difficult shot combinations and consistent execution.

Roddick’s Future Goals

At 30 Roddick has a few good years left if he stays in top condition.  From this point in his career it is unlikely he can still vie for grand slam titles against the likes of Djokovic, but that doesn’t mean he can’t continue to compete at a high level.  It’s unfortunate for Roddick that he has recently fallen out of the top eight.  This drop will exclude him from the end of the year ATP World Tour Finals held in London.   The next few years will see Roddick take down a handful of smaller titles on hard court tennis surfaces to add to an already impressive resume.  Unfortunately for Roddick, American tennis fans will continue to be unsatisfied with such results.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 10.0/10 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: +1 (from 1 vote)

© 2011 FryingPanSports. All Rights Reserved.

This blog is powered by the Wordpress platform and beach rentals.