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  • Published: Nov 30th, 2011
  • Category: Other
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MMA Clothing and Competition Rules

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During the development of the modern incarnation of MMA, or Mixed Martial Arts, rules were virtually nonexistent. As the sport has evolved, however, it has incorporated extensive rules and safety regulations regarding MMA clothing and techiques.

Pre-approval

MMA clothing required for fighters includes preapproved competition shorts, no shirt, and no shoes. Shorts are not allowed to contain any hard plastic or metal components, such as rings, zippers or buckles. Competitors must wear protective mouth guards for the duration of the bout. The fighter’s gender also impacts required MMA clothing; male competitors must wear groin protectors, and female competitors must wear chest protectors.

Athletic Commission

All fighters must wear padded gloves that have been provided by the athletic commission. These gloves must weigh no less than four ounces, but no more than six ounces except in the case of 2XL or larger gloves, which may be slightly heavier than six ounces. Fighters may wear hand wraps made of soft gauze and protective tape under the gloves, but they must be inspected and approved by an athletic commission official before the gloves are put on.

Technical Knockout – TKO

An ordinary MMA fight lasts for three rounds of five minutes each, while a championship fight lasts for five rounds of five minutes each. The fighter’s goal during an MMA bout is to either knock out his opponent or to catch his opponent in a submission hold, such as a choke or a joint lock, from which they cannot escape. A fighter who is caught in a submission hold may end the bout by tapping three times to signal his surrender — this is the same as a knockout. The bout’s referee may stop the contest at any time if he feels that one fighter is no longer able to intelligently defend himself; this results in a victory by technical knockout, or TKO, for the other fighter.

Legal strikes

Fighters are permitted to strike with the hands, feet, shins, forearms, elbows and knees. Headbutting, biting, eye gouging, hair pulling and the like are not allowed. Illegal targets for strikes include the spine, the back of the head, the throat and the groin. Fighters also may not throw elbow strikes straight down with the point in a 12 o’clock to 6 o’clock direction, even to a legal target.
Knee strikes are permitted to the head of a standing opponent, but they are illegal to the head of a downed opponent. A downed opponent is defined as one who has at least three points of contact with the ground. For example, a fighter with one hand and both feet touching the ground, a fighter with one knee and both feet touching the ground, or a fighter lying on his chest or back are all defined as downed.

And the winner is…

If a bout reaches the end of the final round with both competitors still fighting, the winner will be chosen based on a judges’ decision. Each round is scored with ten points going to the round winner, and up to nine points going to the round loser. Eight or even seven points may be awarded to the round loser if that fighter was completely dominated during that round. The bout itself is awarded to the competitor with more total points from all three or all five rounds.

References:
http://www.ufc.com/discover/sport/rules-and-regulations#1

Written by James Steed, who recognises the importance of ensuring you have the correct mma clothing and equipment is essential if you want to compete at the highest levels of Mixed Martial Arts. He recommends Made4Fighters as a quality UK MMA supplier.

  • The Key Differences Between MMA and Boxing (brutusreport.blogspot.com)
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  • Published: Nov 14th, 2011
  • Category: Other
  • Comments: 3

How Did MMA Become So Popular Today?

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Lance Cpl. George R. Lockhart (right), radio r...

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Demand for MMA-style sporting events has been apparent throughout history. Although the modern, professional version of MMA that you see on television has its roots in the late 1980s and 1990s, the sport has existed in some form since the Greco-Roman era. Here is a quick look into the history of MMA and how it got to where it is today.

During the ancient Olympics, a fighting sport included grappling and striking. Early variants of MMA also appeared in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Bartitsu, a fighting art developed in 1898, featured a range of martial art styles mixed into one system, and its practitioners organized MMA-style contests throughout England.

Bruce Lee, intentionally or not, also popularized the sport after famously saying the best fighter was able to “adapt to any style, to be formless, to adopt an individual’s own style” and not follow just one “system of styles.” Other martial arts superstars such as Jackie Chan trained rigorously in various styles and acrobatics. The great martial arts films helped change perspectives on martial arts – adding much prestige, but also making them much cooler than before. Such films not only boosted the popularity of martial arts tenfold but also introduced a new fighting philosophy for existing martial artists to consider.

For years, the biggest, most undisputed fighting sport was, and probably still is, boxing. Boxing’s greatest fighters, such as Ali or Frazier, almost ruled the world with their popularity and influence. The sport’s vast appeal meant other fighting sports stood little to no chance of competing with it.

Traditional martial arts tournaments are, of course, unpopular on television. They are not flashy or exciting except to those well versed in the sport, and they are often too formalized for the average viewer. MMA completely avoided this. Instead, it took martial arts legends and threw them into the ring. The result was a varied and interesting sport, with an entertainment value not so dependant on the viewer’s knowledge of martial arts.

MMA provided a strong alternative to boxing, yet emulated boxing’s most appealing aspects at the same time. The atmosphere of the ring was retained, as were knockouts, and MMA’s greatest champions were heavily popularized. Yet no longer were fights just flurries of fists – fighters specializing in significantly different fighting styles gave the sport freshness and variety.

Finally, MMA has now become an internationally recognized sport, even featured on prime time television on Fox, but it wasn’t easy. When the UFC first started, it received many complaints over the “no holds barred” style of rules of mixed martial arts; back then, the only fighting techniques disallowed were biting, eye-gouging, and groin strikes. Senator John McCain even led a campaign to ban the sport, calling it “human cock fighting.”

However, the UFC and state athletic commissions have since cleaned up the rules of the sport. MMA is now heavily regulated, and for good reason. Barbaric fighting practices such as fish-hooking or small-joint manipulation are now banned, meaning the sport is safer, more skillful, and very much acceptable to mainstream media. The sport is even being considered for the Olympics.

All this shows that MMA is becoming a mainstream, widely-recognized sport. Not everyone is going to like it, and there are still some obstacles to overcome before MMA is on the level of football or soccer, but it is getting there.

William Barnes is a huge MMA fan. When he’s not watching the latest UFC event, he is probably writing for The MMA Fan Guide, an MMA site by MMA fans, for MMA fans.

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