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  • Published: May 23rd, 2012
  • Category: Boxing, Soccer
  • Comments: Comments Off on Top 3 Inspirational Sporting Figures

Top 3 Inspirational Sporting Figures

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English: Bust portrait of Muhammad Ali, World ...

English: Bust portrait of Muhammad Ali, World Journal Tribune photo by Ira Rosenberg (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When it comes to sports, inspiration figures are truly sights to behold. When riding solo, they emulate brave knights, talismanic in battle. When part of a team or squad they resemble army generals, victorious due to their war conduct. Here is a celebration of sport’s most inspirational figures over the years.

Muhammad Ali

The first sportsman to coin the quote ‘I am the greatest’, Muhammad Ali owns this phrase because he simply is the greatest ever boxer to had lived. In fact it wouldn’t even be possible to begrudge Ali claiming he meant the greatest ever ‘sportsman’, when he uttered what was to become his infamous catchphrase.

His speed was incredible, precision tremendous and power mind boggling. Ali was a man of extraordinary talent and charisma. The most entertaining in and out of the ring, Ali’s title as ‘the king’ is hard to dispute.

Sportsmen are often appreciated for their worth away from the actual sports cameras and in front of the interview cameras. Ali also excelled tremendously in this aspect, giving viewers limericks, poems, banter and some truly memorable quotes.

Arkle

Three Cheltenham Gold Cups, Two Hennessy Gold Cups, the Whitbread Gold Cup, Irish Grand National, King George VI and Gallagher Gold Cup speak for themselves. In fact, if I’d just put these accolades as the justification behind this fine horse’s inclusion on our list, it would have sufficed. But that would have been unjustifiable to Arkle, as his praise transcends justification.

As demonstrated in his career defining race in the 1965 Gallagher Gold Cup at Kempton (www.kempton.co.uk) which saw the thoroughbred soar past the 16lb lighter Mill House in just a few strides, Arkle is truly something special.

A simple YouTube clip of him in action would be enough to understand my reasoning behind Arkle being included.

Steven Gerrard

How can Steven Gerrard’s brilliance be put into words? Simply the greatest player to ever grace the Premier League, Gerrard has it all. A leader, an inspiration, a sportsman of exceptional ability and the highest calibre, Gerrard possessed an almost supernatural knack to score the greatest goals in the most important circumstances.

From his screamer against United and Fabien Barthez, to his dream strike against Olympiakos (and we all know how important that goal went on to be), to his magnificent performance in Instanbul that saw him converted as a right back while the match went on, to his super goal against West Ham in the final of the FA Cup, and many more ridiculously superb instances – Gerrard is simply the best.

Tahar Rajab is a British sports freelance writer

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The State of English Football Today

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Soccer

Soccer

The English Premier League is widely regarding as one of the most competitive leagues in world football. And yet, since it’s inception in 1993 only four teams have managed to win the title: Manchester United (12 times), Arsenal and Chelsea (3 times) and Blackburn Rovers (once).

Other teams have attempted to break this domination, usually with the help of some hefty foreign financial backing, including Liverpool, Tottenham and, most recently, Manchester City. As the form begins to settle down for the 2011/2012 season the old familiar faces are appearing at the top of the table and the rest will be left fighting for scraps or desperately trying to avoid relegation.

So where do we get this complacency about our league? Is it the influx of foreign players? Perhaps. But the novelty of watching the biggest names on the international stage plying their trade at Stamford Bridge or Old Trafford has surely worn off. The effects on our national team have been well documented with no sign of a trophy to add to our 1966 World Cup. Hopes of anything appearing in the trophy cabinet any time soon will have taken a dent with our recent scrambled qualification for Euro 2012 via a 2-2 draw in Montenegro and our “star player” sent off for a loutish kick that would have been better suited to a Sunday pub team.

What is perhaps more remarkable is the fact that the collective debt of those clubs fortunate enough to enjoy life in the Premiership is a staggering £3.3 billion. This is often blamed on ridiculous transfer fees and enormous wages needed to attract the biggest names from around the world. Chelsea smashed the record to prize Fernando Torres away from Liverpool for £50 million. Spurs and, possibly future England boss, Harry Redknapp bemoaned the huge amount of money being spent on players and then tried to force Chelsea to go to £40 million to buy Luka Modric. As good a player as he is…is he really worth £40 million? So why is nothing being done to put a stop to it?

The cream of the Premiership are forever boasting about their youth squads and yet the fill them up with youngsters snapped up from abroad. Every year they farm out these “promising youngsters” either on loan deals or to the lower divisions. As long as the Premiership continues to be run in the same way as the country, piling debt upon debt as if there is no tomorrow, then nothing will change.

We have already witnessed the decline of the League Cup into a reserve team competition. The F.A. Cup is heading in the same direction as the emphasis is put on the so-called “Champions League”. It is not a league, it is a cup which is dragged out by its qualifying pool stages before the knockout stages begin. The theory goes that our home-grown talent will benefit from playing with the best on the European stage. In reality it is a gravy train for the big boys. Our best young talent has to gain experience by watching from the substitutes bench and hoping to get 20 minutes during the qualifying stages.

So what became of the good old English game? Players ankle-deep in mud, hoofing it up to the big centre-forward. Well that still exists but is the reserve of the less-fortunate teams that get to compete against the super-rich. Every now and then they will use home advantage combined with a wet and windy British winter to stun their wealthier rivals and send them packing. However, when the points are added up at the end of the season the gulf in class is clear for all to see.

So is our Premier League the best club competition in the world or is it a sell-out of our national game to the television companies and a playground for wealthy investors? You will have to draw your own conclusions.

This is a guest post written by Harvey Mayson, Harvey is a writer for libertygames.co.uk a football tables specialist.

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  • Author:
  • Published: Jul 6th, 2011
  • Category: Soccer
  • Comments: Comments Off on Rewards for Success in Football Europe

Rewards for Success in Football Europe

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English Premier League trophy, inscribed with ...

Image via Wikipedia

Even though football season is now over, teams around the world are examining their finances and planning for the next season. Despite the ever increasing amount of money coming into football, many of the clubs in the Premier League and throughout Europe are still making a loss and even some of the most famous are heavily in debt such as Barcelona with a £400 million debt to go with their champions league trophy. This is hard to believe when we examine the financial rewards currently available for success in modern football.

Manchester United have now earned more than £60m in earnings from Premier League prize money and TV cash from the overseas deals from TV has ensured that current premier league clubs can earn up to £7m more than the 2009 / 2010 season.

The English league governing body better know as the premier league shares out income in various ways firstly the money based on position in the league, then on equal shares of TV income, which is then added to depending on how many times your club is shown on TV on domestic television. The 2010/2011 season, each premier league club received a total of £13.8m of the domestic TV rights and again another £18m as rights to the overseas TV rights. Finally on top of this, From each place in the premier league is worth a staggering £756k, meaning the bottom club West Ham 756k, whilst Manchester United received over £15m.

Success in the F.A. Cup can also generate significant rewards with the winners Manchester City receiving £1,800,000 in prize money and the runners-up, Stoke receiving £900,000. This does not include additional revenue generated from match-day income and TV money. Birmingham City, the winners of the Carling Cup, received a relatively paltry £100,000 in prize money awarded by the Football League, with the runners-up Arsenal receiving merely £50,000 and the losing semi-finalists each taking home £25,000.

Barcelona are expected to generate in the region of £110m from victory in the Champions League final, based on a prize money, an increase in the players worth, the clubs brand, and enhanced media rights . The losers Manchester United will also benefit to the tune of an estimated £63m.

The clubs that took part in this year’s UEFA cup for the older of us or the Europa League received a better revenue from this competition as the prize money as each team that took part this term collected a £640,000 bonus for qualifying to the competition on top of that a £60,000 for every match played in the group stage. The prize money for the clubs that went all the way to the final was €3m for the winner and €2m for the runner-up this is on top of what you earned in previous rounds.

Despite the huge sums of money referred to above, UEFA president Michel Platini has created the financial fair play project, which he hopes will help “to prevent some of our most time-honoured clubs from going under because of risky management by an irresponsible few”.

Garry Hudson currently works for baines and ernst one of the largest debt management companies in the uk, dealing with bankruptcy, Debt relief , IVA’s and more

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