The Browns front office must go!

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There is a lot of conversation about whether Kizer is franchise QB the team has needed for so long.  He might be exactly what the Browns need at the most important position in the game.  But it is hard to tell when so many throws that are right on target are dropped by a receiver group that is worse than 2 teams I coached in semi-pro football.

The brain-dead people making draft picks have given HC Jackson a team that is green as baby peas.  They let the 1 WR that had 1000+ yards and was new to the WR position go but brought in a guy that could not catch a cold standing naked on the edge of Lake Erie in a sleet storm.  He also has 1 1000 yard season but has been in the league for years.

They also passed up 2 other QBs that could have started the “rebuild” much earlier and given beaten down Browns fans some hope.  If this group made good choices with those extra picks I might agree.  They do not and the proof is the 1 win we have seen in the two years that they have been in control.

If Jet QB Josh McCown comes back to Cleveland and beats the Browns, there will be hell to pay.  He is better than most people think and could pull it off.  At least he has led the Jets to a 2 and 2 season so far.

After a 1 and 15 season, the stands will be filled with a lot of empty seats.  That has to concern Browns ownership.  Tickets for the last home game were selling for $6.00.  A few more losses and season ticket holders will not be able to give their tickets away.

That is what I think.  Tell us what you think by commenting here or tweeting me @NNRonDSN.

NOTE:  News, Notes and Rumors podcast are BACK.  Check out our thoughts on Fridays about the games coming up and Monday on the results of the weekend.  My co-host is Samantha Bunten of NBC Sports.  Podcasts can be heard on http://fryingpansports.com/radio-show/. Thanks for your support.

Bill Smith is a former coach of several semi-pro teams, has officiated both football and basketball, done color on radio for college football and basketball and has scouted talent. He edits http://fryingpansports.com.  He has also published several novels on http://www.eBooks-Library.com/Contemporary/ and a non-fiction work at http://www.merriam-press.com/.  Follow him on twitter @NNRonDSN to get the schedule of Special News, Notes and Rumors broadcasts.  You can hear the previous shows on http://fryingpansports.com/radio-show/.

To keep up with the News, Notes & Rumors podcasts, follow me on twitter @NNRonDSN.

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Want to know how American Football got started?

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1946 Chicago Bears Championship Team

1946 Chicago Bears Championship Team (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

How American Football Got Started

Our good friend Evan Weiner of NewJerseyNewsroom.com has written an E-Book entitled America’s Passion: How a Coal Miner’s Game Became the NFL in the 20th Century.  Here is an excerpt:

The National Football League is the premier sport in the United States. But it always wasn’t that way. Author Evan Weiner takes us back to the days when the NFL was a mom and pop store operation with the players and others who witnessed the league’s growth first hand. The game started in the coal mines in western Pennsylvania and is a multi-billion dollar business today.

The NFL started in 1920, teams came and went. That history would repeat itself in the 1930s and the 1940s. Stability finally occurred in the 1950s with the arrival of television. Television transformed North American sports. In 1950, Baseball, Boxing and Horse Racing were among the most popular sporting events in the country. Within 10 years, football, the NFL, would begin its ascent and by 1965 become the country’s most popular sport.

In the old days, you could find Chicago Bears owner and coach George Halas at the Chicago Bears offices in the fall and part of winter, the rest of the year he would be in his Chicago sporting goods store. Andy Robustelli is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame for his work with the Los Angeles Rams and New York Giants. Robustelli was a star with Los Angeles between 1951 and 1955 but requested a trade to New York because he could not be away from his thriving Stamford, Connecticut businesses and the Rams accommodated him. As Hall of Famer Artie Donovan once told me, his NFL of the 1950s bares absolutely no resemblance to today’s NFL.

The National Football League was in the right place at the right time. There is no better TV game than football. A viewer can see everything as it develops on the field, the line of scrimmage, the quarterback handing off or passing the ball and the receiver catching it. It’s an easy game to watch and it didn’t hurt that the New York Giants won a World’s Championship in 1956 and played in the “Greatest Game of All Time” in 1958, losing in the NFL Championship game to Johnny Unitas and the Baltimore Colts. That game started the lasting love affair between Americans and football. The Giants became the darlings of Madison Avenue, led by the handsome Frank Gifford and football gained acceptance. By 1960, the CBS show “20th Century” hosted by Walter Cronkite caught the football bug. The CBS weekly documentary ran a program entitled, “The Violent World of Sam Huff.” Huff, the Giants middle linebacker was profiled and miked during a pre-season game to give the viewers an inside look during an NFL game.

The move from the mom and pop operations, the old football families, the Maras in New York, the Rooneys in Pittsburgh, Halas in Chicago to today’s corporate status did not come overnight. The NFL had to fend off a rival league between 1946-49, taking in three All American Football Conference franchises in 1950, and continued to be plagues by franchise failures until 1952. The NFL enjoyed some franchise success between 1953 and 1956 and started to make plans to expand with the goal of adding teams by 1961. The Giants-Colts 1958 Championship Game changed football. Dallas businessman Lamar Hunt, who struck in his attempts to move the Chicago Cardinals to his home city talked to Houston businessman Bud Adams in 1959 about starting a rival league after Adams failed to purchase the Cardinals and move them to Houston.

In my opinion it is a must read for any NFL fan. The E-Book is available at the following sites:

http://www.kobobooks.com/ebook/Americas-Passion/book-YVIBgJtJuE6LPKUdXzQ73Q/page1.html?s=atJ2A6g-jka2uJsNWWmhYA&r=1

https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/americas-passion-how-coal/id595575002?mt=11

It is a bargain at just $2.99

 

That’s what I think. Tell me what you think.

 

Bill Smith is a former coach of several semi-pro teams, has officiated both football and basketball, done color on radio for college football and basketball and has scouted talent. He is a senior writer for and edits http://fryingpansports.com. His first non-fiction work is at the publisher now and he has also published several novels on http://www.eBooks-Library.com/Contemporary/Author.cfm?AuthorID=1003  and edits http://fryingpanpolitics.org.

 

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The Social Force Of The National Football League

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Marine Corps Maj. (Ret) Mike Fonteno got a sur...

NFL Fans Among Most Social

American football as it is widely referred to in many quarters is one of the most celebrated sport in America and the National Football League (NFL)  is arguably the most profitable sports business on this planet. The American population is widely renowned  for the love of football, if it is not watching an NFL game on the television with a couple of friends or family then you will probably find them on the stadium cheering  on their favorite NFL team. That in itself goes a long way to show the social impact NFL has on the lives of many people.

Well, a number of factors come into play when you consider NFL fans among most social. Firstly, the NFL is usually associated with a lot of fun fare that goes a long way in attracting large audiences. Talk of the color and pomp usually seen on the game day inside and outside the stadiums, the cheering squads and the entertainment the fans get to enjoy inside the stadium during recess period. Those who opt to enjoy the game at the comfort of their living rooms are not left out as well, they get to  bond with friends  as they enjoy a game of football. All this activities go a long way in creating a socially conducive environment for the  interaction of fans.

And although the league has recently put some limits on players, coaches and referees using Twitter during the games and 90 minutes prior to the games, players are widely followed on social media and interact regularly with their fans.

In a nutshell, the NFL has cemented its place as one of America’s most  popular sporting culture and as such it is inevitable that it has grown to be a social force to reckon with. The passion it commands within its ranks certainly aids in the understanding of why we find NFL fans among most social.

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Interview with CB Prince Amukamara Nebraska

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Prince Amukamara Nebraska

My thanks to Prince, Brian Leonardi of the France AllPro Athlete Management, Inc. and Mr. Moohead of Mooheadradio.com for allowing me the opportunity to talk to the future star of the NFL.

Amukamara is my top rated CB and gets the nod over Patrick Peterson of LSU because of his better tackling and run defense. Both will be very good CBs in the NFL but I prefer Amukamara.

Here is the audio of the interview.

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Bill Smith’s College Player Rating System

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American Football player Peyton Manning talks ...

Image via Wikipedia

nflDraft

By Bill Smith

To see more analysis like this 6 days a week, visit my site http://fryingpansports.com

We all like to evaluate how badly our favorite teams have screwed up the draft. I though you might like to see how I evaluate players. I will be doing a draft rap up here on the Browns and other teams after the draft.

This outlines the system I have used for more than 40 years in evaluating college players for the NFL draft. The system is based on a point system. A number of years ago, I was in Indy the week of the Combine. I ran into a couple of Colt scouts in the hotel lobby. I suggested that they look at a C that I really liked but would probably not be drafted. He wasn’t drafted but the Colts signed him as a rookie undrafted free agent. The player was Jeff Saturday. All he has done is become an all pro for many years and the captain of the O line for Payton Manning. I found him using this system.

To use it, there are a few rules that must be followed.

Rules:

Only use the first half of games except for all star games. That eliminates players taking quarters off or taking unnecessary risks from a blowout.

The point system is used. A single play can generate no more than 5 points for any player.

It is impossible to effectively grade O and D line live. Slow motion is necessary to evaluate plays in these areas.

To get a reliable grade for a player, you must see at least 8 quarters of play. With 4 quarters you can get a good idea but to be sure the more games the better. That also balances the quality of opponents.

Only grade the seniors and probable juniors entering the draft. It is almost impossible to evaluate all 22 players on every play unless you have no life what so ever. Most seasons I wait until the under classmen have declared to do my detailed study of players.

Only award positive or negative numbers for above (or below) average plays. An average player is expected to make average plays regularly. This is one subjective area of the evaluation. However, if you are consistent with your grading, you can compare players in the same position on different teams.

Up to 2 pluses or minuses can be awarded for a play. For example a 5 yard penalty is -1 (pn-) while anything more than 5 yards is -2 (pn=). These are still within the 5 point rule.

Credit the player that deserves credit. An interception that bounces off a players hands and is picked is charged to the receiver not the passer. The D player that forces a QB into the arms of another gets half a sack as does the tackler.

Scoring:

OL 1 point each—p-Pass block r-Run block (lineman pulls or blocks down field and makes the block) d-Drive block NOTE: If a lineman pulls and misses the block he gets 0 on the play not a -.

Scoring for “skill” players (includes the above plus the following):

QB 1 point each as am al (accuracy in short, medium and long passes) tou (touch) xr (avoid rush) r(run)

QB 2 points each aw (awareness/looking off the safety) rd (reading D finding open receiver)

QB -3 points each x(interception) fl (fumble)

RB/WR 1 point each c (catch) r (run) v (vision) add a + for each tackle broken b (block) a (attempted catch of a bad ball) o (get open) d- (drop)

RB/WR 2 points each yac (yards after catch/contact) e (effort) aw (awareness) fl (fumble) fr (fumble of another recovered)

Miscellaneous (Defense or offense)

1 point each t (tackle) ms mm ml (man coverage short, med, long) z (zone) pb (pass blocked) pd (pass defended down field) r (run d) p (pass rush)

2 points each h (hurry QB to inc. pass) aw rd (read play) s (sack) fr (fumble recovered)

3 points each x (interception) xc (interception caused by rush or tipped ball) fc (fumble caused) bkp (blocked punt) bkk (blocked kick)

Only for those that are really into evaluating DBs: If a sack occurs after 4 seconds of the snap, each DB gets a G (group sack) worth one point to each.

In addition, the pn is a minus as described above but if a player causes a penalty he gets a pc (penalty caused) worth one point for a 5 yard and 2 pts for more than 5 yards.

Now I am sure that everyone wants to know what is a good score and what is a bad one. That like beauty is in the eye of the evaluator. O line and D players should average more than 8 points in a half. QB and RBs should get 12+ to be considered very good. WR vary a lot depending on how many times they are thrown to. Those are scores according to my evaluations. Yours may well differ depending on what you call an above average play. It is a tool to rank different players in the same position. However, if you see a player that is not well thought of that scores very high in all games seen, he is probably going to be a steal in the draft.

One last thing. The scores for each player should be listed in order that the games were played. A good player that shows consistent improvement from 5 to 7 to 9 to 11 points during the season moves ahead of a player that is level or moves down from early to late. When you have players with different numbers of games evaluated, use the average score per game for each.

This is a lot of work and not many will want to do it. However, it also works for evaluating pro players but their scores should be a little higher to be considered above average. I hope you at least try this system and would love to know what you think after you have.

This system is copyrighted by W.E. Smith. It is posted here for the private use of our readers and may not be reproduced in any other forum, form or on the net without the written permission of the author.

Please join me for the best Sports Talk anywhere on the Internet and hear his sports show Monday-Friday 8-10 EST on http://www.cleveland.com/dsn/index.ssf/2010/11/dsn_video_live_stream.html

Bill Smith is a former coach of several semi-pro teams, has officiated both football and basketball, done color on radio for college football and basketball and has scouted talent. He is a senior writer for and edits http://fryingpansports.com. He has also published several novels on and edits .

My email is [email protected]

Technorati Tags: NFL Draft,mock draft,2011 NFL Draft,player evaluation,combine,college all star games
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